Day 6 B – Tyne Cot

The largest British Cemetery
Stopping at the Cemetery at Tyne Cot, you see a massive collection of graves, plus the walls of names of the missing. The walls here were used to continue the names of the Soliders with no known graves as there was not enough space on the Menin Gate for all of them.

Buried at this location is a number of Victoria Cross winners. I took the time to fine Private Robertson, VC, whose family comes from Medicine Hat but he was a member of the Manitoba Regiment. I have never stood in the presence of a Canadian VC recipient. Our last living one died recently so it is unlikely that I will ever meet a living one so standing at the grave of Private Roberston is as close as I will likely ever come.

I noticed below one of the walls a laminated card had been placed, it read

“Lance Corporal Henry John Martin, Royal West Kent Regiment, Born Islington 14th October 1880I was mobilised from the reserve in August 1914 and fought at St Ghislain, Mons, retreated down to the Marne, raced toward the sea via the Aisne and survived Neuve Chapelle despite being almost surrounded.
With C Company I helped to take Hill 60 on 17th April 1915, fought through 2nd Ypres and was wounded at High Wood, Somme on 22nd July 1916. I spent 14 months convalescing in Blighty only to return to Passchendaele and be blown to pieces at Poelcapelle on 27th November 1917. I have no know grave, only my name on this panel and a plaque dedicated to me at St Georges Memorial Church, Ieper.

I did my Best

Please Remember me.”

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