This is part II in my little story arc on re-organizing my technology use. As stated in my first installment:

I’ve been looking at what I have and how I’ve been using it and it was time for a little Personal Technology Tune-up. I went on a little Data diet – sort of.

One big area was the issue of how many RSS feeds I was subscribed to. In general the major ‘news’ sources, whether public media (BBC, CBC, NBC, Times) or a specific news ‘vertical’ such as gadget news (Engadget, Gizmodo, TechCrunch), tend to uncover the same stories and you end up with the same basic story in 10-20 different versions. So you are getting a lot of noise for a single piece of information. So I removed the more generic sources from my RSS reader and threw a little logic at it. In this case it was Shaun Inman’s logic through his RSS tool Fever. To make this work you need a server to put this on so this tool is not applicable to everyone. But in general, the idea is to break out the more generic ‘mass market news’ and get it away from the more specialized sources that typically get buried by the high volume sources.

Fever RSS Screenshot

Fever boils down the thousands of items in the all those high volume RSS feeds and gives you a top down list of the most popular stories. This provides you a customized filter of all that information which you can further customize by rating your feeds as either “Sparks” – more important feeds, or “Kindling” – less important feeds. So Fever provides you a way to absorb the most common stories. If something really does hit a cord I can email, save, or forward to a number of online sharing service. (More on those services in a later post).

That left my main RSS reader (Google Reader) with about 150 feeds down from almost 400. But the important point is only 10 of these average more than 2 posts/day. and the majority are less than 1 post/day on average. So I go from over 1000 items to read a day to less than 400 on a busy day and less than 100 on many days. Google Reader now only has my friends and colleagues blogs, specialty blogs like Flying, Education, and Photography. I also have a few specific searches, mostly from Google Alerts, that produce RSS feeds which are in Reader.

While 400 might even sound a bit high, a little workflow is required to manage that many. First the general selection of Google Reader opens the door to a number of ways to read the content. Both on any computer I happen to be in front of (via web interface), on any mobile device via the mobile version of the website, but also via a number of dedicated viewers. I find Google Reader a good experience on my laptop or desktop, the mobile version is not as usable. After a recommendation I tried Reeder for my iPhone. The unique iPhone interface makes it easy to triage RSS items and either mark them Read or Star them with a swipe of your thumb. This is an excellent application and it makes a few minutes in the store line or the time on the treadmill usable for scanning your more specific feeds.

Reeder ScreenShot
Screenshots from http://reederapp.com/2/#/2/
Reeder Screenshot, Sharing
Screenshots from http://reederapp.com/2/#/2/

Since I might scan my RSS a few times a day, it is seldom that I have more than 20-30 unread items to review. That is totally manageable.

Most of the RSS I watch is for general information and to stay on top of new ideas and information. When there is an RSS item that is specifically interest that is when I will use the tools to mark it for follow up at a later time. In Google Reader that is by ‘Staring’ the post (hit the S key while viewing) or with similar ease in Reeder on my iPhone. Then once I have time to go to the source and really get into the content I will review the items in my “Starred Items”. This is typically an evening activity at my main computer where I can be more engaged in the content. Once finished the Star comes off.

Adding new feeds, if I ever do feel the need to adding a new RSS feed to either Google Reader or Fever both have a bookmarklet that sits in you browser to add the RSS feed from any page to the tool with a click.

While that covers most of the RSS content, I will give an honorable mention to Feedly. Feedly provides another interface to you Google Reader feed in a Newspaper style format. It also provides a useful toolbar to email, tweet, bookmark, or share a webpage or feed.


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