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Commitment to Personal Productivity… Multiple Mailboxes and filtering

This is part III in my little story arc on re-organizing my technology use. As stated in my first instalment:

I’ve been looking at what I have and how I’ve been using it and it was time for a little Personal Technology Tune-up. I went on a little Data diet – sort of.

The next area was the details of email. I am lucky to control a number of domains so I have more flexability in email than most. But with the advent of gmail and other web services with large storage, owning a domain is less of a big deal.

Again, since I own my own domains I can have as many emails as I want. I had initially tried to segment my life by creating different emails and using them for different purposes. A general email address for common web use, a personal email of friends and family, and several company emails for business communication. Two problems with this, you have to be disciplined in giving the emails out and you have to rely on others to use them appropriately. That system also ignored the ‘search and find’ routine that unknown contacts will use to find you.

So that idea went out the door and I funnel and sort mentality replaced it. Almost all my email traffic funnels to a single account, then that account has some basic filters on what to do with them. As an intermediate state I have a single Gmail account that I can funnel my mail through. I then have 5 other accounts (some Gmail, some not) that I use for specific type if mail.

In general my mail runs into 4 piles, excluding spam.

The easiest to filter is the high volume listserve traffic. While RSS is okay for ‘news’ some sources of information and discussion are best consumed as an email digest. These are mostly technical and professional forums. Those filter through to a separate account, and then are marked by the list they come from. Some Google Alerts arrive via email also get sorted this way.

Adding Google Alerts

The second biggest pile is the business communication slightly above the Spam threshold. This is not listserve but it is regular mailings from companies I do business soliciting business or making special offers. I avoid deleting these outright because they are occasionally helpful but it is a high volume, low return pile of data. Typically only look through that when I’m very bored.

In a similar pattern to the RSS ideas before, the high volume stuff has been filtered out and the lower volume, higher return communication is left. Most of the last 2 piles stay in my personal mailbox. For lack of a better title, the Household Business mail is the notifications about bills, events, and other items that are important, require action, but seldom have a real person on the other end. Since this information comes from known sources it is easy to create rules to tag those items, leave them unread and await further action at at time of my connivence.

The final group is actually the important stuff. Typically this personal correspondence from family and friends. It also does leave items that either don’t have a rule from the 3 items above or aren’t easily classified. There is a little ambiguity there but the volume is sufficiently low that it really isn’t a distraction.

One of the items that make the multiple mail accounts a usable idea is an appropriate mail tool. Since I almost exclusively use Gmail for my domains I’ve recently moved to Mailplane to allow an easy way to jump between accounts without the hassle of continually logging in and out of a web identity. It is possible to do similar things with other desktop mail clients but once you commit to Gmail a custom tool that works with Gmail’s quirks is very useful.

Mailplane App Drag and drop to create attachments

Drag and drop to create attachments

A little tip here at the end.

The other feature of Gmail, and some other mail services, is the ability to create random mail identities. This is done by adding a “+” and any other text after your username. Unless the site does something to strip this out you can actually have unique addresses for any service you subscribe to. Which again makes filtering incoming mail very easy. It also allows tracking of how your email is getting to third parties. I add a timestamp to the email so things like admin@gmail.com becomes admin+1003290820@gmail.com (1003290820 = 2010/03/29 at 8:20AM). I have a little macro that creates these for me.


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